Florida monkeypox tally now at 9, Most in Broward County

According to the CDC Wednesday, 84 total confirmed monkeypox/orthopoxvirus cases have been reported from 18 states and the District of Columbia.

Image/CDC

The State of Florida has accounted for nine confirmed or probable cases–four acquired in Florida, four acquired outside the country and one case is unknown.

Of the nine cases, four have been confirmed.

Eight of the cases have been reported in Broward County, while Collier County has reported a single case to date.

All of the cases have been reported in people ages 25 to 59.

Monkeypox is a viral infection that can spread through contact with body fluids, sores on the body of someone who has monkeypox, or shared items (e.g., clothing and bedding) that have been contaminated with fluids from sores of a person with monkeypox.

The disease can also spread between people through saliva or respiratory droplets, typically between people in a close setting. Although monkeypox is not generally considered a sexually transmitted disease, it can be transmitted during sex through skin-to-skin and other intimate contact, regardless of gender or sexual orientation.

The virus is not known to linger in the air and is not transmitted during short periods of shared airspace.

Symptoms of monkeypox are similar to, but milder than, the signs and symptoms of smallpox. They include: Fever, Headache, Muscle aches, Backache, Swollen lymph nodes, Chills and Exhaustion.

A rash usually develops within 1 to 3 days after the appearance of fever. The rash often begins on the face and then spreads to other parts of the body.

Most people who develop monkeypox experience symptoms 7 to 14 days (and up to 21 days) after exposure.

The majority of people who become infected with monkeypox have a mild illness that improves without treatment over 2 to 4 weeks. Monkeypox is contagious and can spread to others until scabs have fallen off and a new layer of skin has formed.

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