The Electoral College, the National Popular Vote and the Save Our States project - Tampa Dispatch

The Electoral College, the National Popular Vote and the Save Our States project

Image by mohamed Hassan from Pixabay

The Electoral College–many groups have tried and are trying to change it. The topic became alive again in 2016 with the electoral victory of Donald Trump, while Hillary Clinton received the popular vote edge.

What does the Constitution say? What did the Framers say? How has it worked? And what is the National Popular Vote?

Joining me to take a deeper look at the Electoral College is Trent England, Trent is the director of the Save Our States project at the Oklahoma Council of Public Affairs and an attorney.

Show host, Robert Herriman looks at issues of politics, society and culture through interviews with expert guests and commentary, news and analysis. He always calls balls and strikes on important issues of the day.

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Image by mohamed Hassan from Pixabay

About the Author

Robert Herriman
In addition to his work on the Tampa Dispatch, Robert is the Editor-in-Chief of the health and disease website, Outbreak News Today. He also hosts the podcast, Outbreak News Interviews on Apple Podcasts, Stitcher Radio and other platforms.

1 Comment on "The Electoral College, the National Popular Vote and the Save Our States project"

  1. Past presidential candidates with a public record of support, before November 2016, for the National Popular Vote bill that would guarantee the majority of Electoral College votes and the presidency to the candidate with the most national popular votes: Bob Barr (Libertarian- GA), U.S. House Speaker Newt Gingrich (R–GA), Congressman Tom Tancredo (R-CO), and Senator Fred Thompson (R–TN).

    Newt Gingrich summarized his support for the National Popular Vote bill by saying: “No one should become president of the United States without speaking to the needs and hopes of Americans in all 50 states. … America would be better served with a presidential election process that treated citizens across the country equally. The National Popular Vote bill accomplishes this in a manner consistent with the Constitution and with our fundamental democratic principles.”

    Eight former national chairs of the American Legislative Exchange Council (ALEC) have endorsed the bill

    In 2017, Saul Anuzis and Michael Steele, the former chairmen of the Michigan and national Republican parties, wrote that the National Popular Vote bill was “an idea whose time has come”.

    On March 7, 2019, the Delaware Senate passed the National Popular Vote bill in a bi-partisan 14-7 vote

    In 2018, the National Popular Vote bill in the Michigan Senate was sponsored by a bipartisan group of 25 of the 38 Michigan senators, including 15 Republicans and 10 Democrats.

    The bill was approved in 2016 by a unanimous bipartisan House committee vote in both Georgia (16 electoral votes) and Missouri (10).

    In 2016 the Arizona House of Representatives passed the bill 40-16-4.
    Two-thirds of the Republicans and two-thirds of the Democrats in the Arizona House of Representatives sponsored the bill.
    In January 2016, two-thirds of the Arizona Senate sponsored the bill.

    In 2014, the Oklahoma Senate passed the bill by a 28–18 margin.

    In 2009, the Arkansas House of Representatives passed the bill

    On March 25, 2014 in the New York Senate, Republicans supported the bill 27-2; Republicans endorsed by the Conservative Party by 26-2; The Conservative Party of New York endorsed the bill.
    In the New York Assembly, Republicans supported the bill 21–18; Republicans endorsed by the Conservative party supported the bill 18–16.

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